prettyaddictedliar:

Troian Bellisario everybody

thehttydblog:

jackthevulture:

Imagine Hagrid going to Berk.

Imagine it.

Bearded men the same size as him.

Dragons of every shape and size.

IMAGINE HAGRID ON BERK.

Yer a Viking Hagrid.

(via theboomeraang)

"The sex drive of men is something we are all comfortable with in this country. It’s funny and hormonal and slapstick (American Pie), it’s potentially uncontrollable, maniacal/homicidal (American Psycho), it is adulterous and is insatiable (American Beauty), it is fun and social (American Graffiti) and it is entrepreneurial (American Gigolo). But women? No. NC-17. XXXX. Stop it with the moaning."

tropicalasis:

you’re all going to hell

(Source: tomorrowsofyesterday, via unicorn-feelings)

(Source: orhgasm, via unicorn-feelings)

(Source: sandandglass, via wilwheaton)

theroomofhiddenthings:

that’s it. that’s the show.

(Source: mihtrandir, via this-i-swearbythestars)

bluesigma:

nostlenne:

acontributor:

nooneneedsfeminism:

nikaalexandra:

apparently it’s nineteen fucking twenty

what a stupid fucking comic 

Oh good, people are doing shitthatdidnthappen.txt in shitthatdidnthappen.png form now!

No, this shit definitely happens. Retail attracts throwbacks just by virtue of you’re getting exposed to triple digit numbers of people per day with very little overlap. Assholes and people who are just sexist beyond the fucking pale showing up is inevitable.

I’ve seen female customers actually fucking complain when there are guys working in certain sections (dollhouses, barbies/bratz/pollypocket/whatever, and baby items were the big ones), and between me and the three other girls that worked R-zone, one of which was also a floor associate who hung out in the hotwheels/tonka/action figure sections, all of us have at least one story of a dude as pictured here.

And that’s just in a goddamn toy store.

i really hate how “it didnt happen” is getting slapped on everything these days, even if it’s completely plausible.

(via this-i-swearbythestars)

nprglobalhealth:

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone

Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. “Obama’s Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. “Is the fist bump the new high-five?” NPR’s Laura Silverman asked.

Obama has done it again.

Earlier this month he cemented the gesture as part of his presidential persona when he fist bumped an employee at an Austin barbecue restaurant. Before taking Obama’s order, Daniel Rugg said, “Equal rights for gay people,” the Austin Chronicle reported. Then the presidential bump followed.

All this fist-to-fist action got us thinking: Where did the fist bump come from? Why is it so appealing that the president uses it? And do other cultures have similar nonverbal gestures?

The modern fist bump most likely evolved from the high-five in the sports world, says David Givens, an anthropologist with the Center for Nonverbal Studies in Spokane, Washington. The 1970s Baltimore Bullets guard Fred Carter was an early bumper, Time reported back in 2008. Eventually the fist bump became a way for friends to greet each other.

Givens believes that the fist bump stands out in the world of nonverbal gestures. “The fist bump is one of the few gestures that is equal,” he tells Goats and Sodas. “You could do it with President Obama, and you’d both be equals at that time.”

That’s because the knuckles are meeting at the same level — neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.

Continue reading.

Photo by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

(Source: braindead, via thefuuuucomics)

mausspace:

weirdtrip:

he looks so pleased

"oh look. look at this apple. it me"

horf horf horf

(Source: tkr, via theboomeraang)